Safety measures OK’d for San Elijo Road

 General, Infrastructure Management, Planning, Risk Management  Comments Off on Safety measures OK’d for San Elijo Road
Feb 082013
 
Eastbound San Elijo Road at Eclipse Drive

Eastbound San Elijo Road at Eclipse Drive

Source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/feb/07/traffic-safety-san-elijo-road-eclipse-san-marcos/

By Chris Nichols 10:01 a.m.Feb. 7, 2013

SAN MARCOS, CA — New safety measures are on the way for a curvy stretch of San Elijo Road in San Marcos, following complaints from residents about recent crashes near Eclipse Drive.

The stretch of road is about a mile north of San Elijo Hills elementary and middle schools.

On Wednesday night, the San Marcos Traffic Safety Commission approved plans to add: A new curve warning and speed advisory sign in the roadway’s median; new reflective covers for all new and existing traffic signs in the area; and raised pavement markers.

The citizen panel also OK’d plans to request more speed enforcement from the sheriff’s department along the 45 mph four-lane stretch of San Elijo, which has a steep grade and connects the upscale community of roughly 7,000 people to the rest of San Marcos.

Finally, the panel also approved requests for San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to install guard rails to protect company utility boxes that have been damaged in past crashes; and approved plans to install speed radar feedback signs for the area at a later date.

Residents in nearby neighborhoods lost power for several hours after two recent crashes into the utility boxes.

In the past five years, the city has logged five traffic accidents along San Elijo Road near Eclipse, which feeds into the Meridian and Mariner’s Landing residential neighborhoods of about 200 homes, according to a city report.

Causes for those accidents included unsafe speed, improper turning, drunken driving or a combination of those, the report said.

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ADA compliance: ‘Drive-by’ lawsuits may go up this year

 Infrastructure Management, Planning, Risk Management, Walkability/ADA  Comments Off on ADA compliance: ‘Drive-by’ lawsuits may go up this year
Aug 132012
 

Source: Kami Corbett, Tampa Bay Business Journal

As the Tampa Bay area spiffs up its appearance for the Republican National Convention this month, local businesses need to be mindful that back in 2010 the Department of Justice modified the Americans with Disability Act (“ADA”) compliance standards, imposing new design standards for new construction and alterations to existing structures.

Mandatory compliance with those standards began on March 15, 2012. All businesses must be aware of the new standards, whether they are constructing a building, completing a major renovation, undertaking small scale projects or just making cosmetic upgrades.

Getting the facts straight

Misunderstanding No. 1: If a business is located in an older building it is “grandfathered” and need not be concerned with compliance. This is not the case. The ADA does not exempt existing buildings. In fact, it actually requires every business to undergo a fact-specific inquiry as to whether making the business accessible is readily achievable. This means that unless making the building accessible is an undue burden on the business, a business must make the necessary changes to make it accessible.

Unfortunately, there is no bright line test for determining what constitutes an undue burden. It is a fact-specific analysis that takes into consideration the nature and cost of the alteration that would be necessary to make the business accessible, along with the financial strength of the company (including parent companies) and the overall effect on the business.

Misunderstanding No. 2: Tenants are not responsible for ADA compliance. A tenant is also required to analyze whether it is readily achievable to make the business accessible. Therefore, it is highly likely that both the landlord and the tenant will be named in a non-compliance suit, leaving the private parties to argue about who is most responsible for bearing the cost of compliance.

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SR-125 Road and Storm Drain Condition Evaluation

 General, GIS, Infrastructure Management, Planning  Comments Off on SR-125 Road and Storm Drain Condition Evaluation
Feb 152012
 

Opened in 2007, the State Route (SR) 125 toll road is approximately 10 miles long and extends from HWY 54 to I-905 in the City of Chula Vista, San Diego County, California. The city of Chula Vista witnessed rapid growth in housing development during the housing boom of the mid-2000s. An estimated 30,000 residential, commercial, and other parcel units were slated for development in this region. The SR-125 toll road, which was privately operated by South Bay Expressway (SBX), was created to accommodate this rapid expansion.

However, the economic slowdown of 2008 arrived and hit boom towns like Chula Vista particularly hard. Ridership and revenue projections made during the boom cycle fell short under the reality of recession. On July 29, 2011, the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) voted to purchase the lease from SBX for about $345 million with various contingencies. (http://www.sandag.org/index.asp?newsid=698&fuseaction=news.detail)

VanderHawk Consulting LLC was contracted to perform a condition assessment of the road pavement and storm drainage systems on the SR-125 toll road and report the findings. The road pavement condition assessment was performed in accordance with the MicroPAVER pavement management protocol, while the storm drainage assessment was performed in a manner consistent with CalTrans’ storm drainage system evaluation procedures.  Almost 1,400 images (many geo-tagged) were captured for this project and comprise the most extensive analytical photo archive of the SR-125 toll road and drainage networks to date.

May 232011
 

Spent the morning with the family in beautiful San Clemente, California.  Avenida Del Mar is a main village attraction and draws people to it with its many unique shops, Spanish colonial architecture, and pedestrian-friendly environment.  The people there are some of the friendliest you’ll meet anywhere.  Community leaders and businesses are very much into promoting a more vibrant downtown village experience and they realize that fostering a pedestrian-friendly, or “walkable” environment is an important factor.

*All photos copyright Vanderhawk Consulting LLC